Microsoft Surface 2: still a hard sell at retail

I am a fan of Microsoft’s Surface 2; but looking at the display at Dixons in Heathrow’s Terminal 3 it is obvious that Microsoft has work to do in terms of retail presence.

There are no clues here as to why anyone might want to buy a Surface, and no indication that Surface 2 runs anything other than standard Windows 8, other than the two letters RT which you can read on the spec summary.

Windows RT is both better and worse than Windows on Intel. It is worse because you cannot install new desktop applications, but it is better because it is locked down and less likely to suffer from viruses or annoying OEM add-ons and customisations that usually result in a worse user experience.

Why did Microsoft not come up with a distinctive brand name for RT, such as AppWindows or StoreWindows or WinBook? I am open to negotiation should Microsoft wish to use one of my brand ideas :-)

Surface 2 has excellent performance, Microsoft Office is bundled including Outlook (though without the ability to run Visual Basic macros), and it is expandable using Micro SD cards or USB 3.0 devices, all features I miss when using an Apple iPad.

I do use the desktop a lot on Surface 2. Simple applications like Paint and Notepad are useful especially since they have, you know, cool resizable and overlapping windows so you can have multiple applications on view.

The Apple iPad is better displayed and I am sure its greater prominence is more than justified by relative sales.

 

Related posts:

  1. Sunspider JavaScript Benchmark on 4 models of Microsoft Surface
  2. Microsoft Surface is coming: Windows, but not as you know it
  3. Microsoft financials: nearly a $billion lost on Surface RT but prospering in server and cloud
  4. First thoughts on Surface 2
  5. FutureMark graphics benchmark: Surface RT vs Surface 2

One thought on “Microsoft Surface 2: still a hard sell at retail

  1. Eric

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    Not being able to install other desktop applications make the above even more frustrating. I’m sure quite a few developers would be willing to recompile their apps for ARM and use on Surface Desktop, and then it could become a viable alternative to an iPad or Android tablet.
    A 10″ screen was too small for serious Office usage back in the netbook days, and it still is, but other apps could be useful.

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